Allergies Articles A-Z

Food Allergy Symptoms - Goldenseal and Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Allergies Articles containing information on subjects from Food Allergy Symptoms to Goldenseal and Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Food Allergy Symptoms
    Common food allergy symptoms include breathing problems, swelling of the throat, and hives. This eMedTV article explains several other symptoms in detail and discusses the dangers of anaphylaxis, a life-threatening form of allergic reaction.
  • Food Allergy to Tartrazine
    As this eMedTV article explains, tartrazine (also known as Yellow No. 5) is a food additive that may cause some people to experience itching or hives. This page discusses food allergy to tartrazine and explains the labeling laws for this additive.
  • Food Allergy Treatment
    An important part of food allergy treatment involves avoiding the foods that trigger reactions. This eMedTV article discusses several treatment options, such as epinephrine injections and antihistamines, for food allergies.
  • Generic Actifed
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic forms of Actifed are available, sold under various names and by different manufacturers. This page further discusses generic Actifed and explains why the brand-name original version is no longer sold.
  • Generic Alavert
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, generic Alavert products are available. This resource further discusses these generic medications and explains why they could be considered generic versions of Claritin and Claritin-D.
  • Generic Alaway
    Alaway is currently available in both brand-name and generic form. As this page from the eMedTV library explains, generic Alaway is available in one strength -- ketotifen 0.025% -- and is manufactured by several different drug companies.
  • Generic Allegra
    As this eMedTV page describes, generic Allegra is sold under the name Fexofenadine hydrochloride tablets and comes in three different strengths. This article also takes a look at what the drug is used to treat, as well as who manufactures it.
  • Generic Allegra-D
    A generic version of the 24-hour strength of Allegra-D is now available. This section of the eMedTV library talks about generic Allegra-D in more detail, addressing when a generic version of the 12-hour strength is expected.
  • Generic Alrex
    Alrex is not available in generic form at this time. This page from the eMedTV archives offers information on why generic Alrex products are currently not allowed to be manufactured in the U.S. and explains when these products could become available.
  • Generic Astelin
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Astelin is now available in generic form. This resource offers more information on this product, including who makes it, how it compares to the brand-name version, and more.
  • Generic Astepro
    At this time, there is no generic version of Astepro available in the United States. This eMedTV Web page explains when a generic Astepro drug could become available and describes the difference between a generic medication and its "generic name."
  • Generic Beconase
    While the patents for Beconase have expired, no companies have chosen to make generic Beconase products. This eMedTV segment further explains why there are currently no generic versions of the nasal spray and if any may become available.
  • Generic Benadryl
    There are many generic Benadryl products available, including tablets, capsules, sprays, and creams. This eMedTV page describes these various generic versions in more detail and explains which products are not available in generic form.
  • Generic Bepreve
    At this time, generic Bepreve is unavailable because exclusivity rights protect the medicine. This eMedTV page explains when a generic version could become available and describes the difference between a generic name and a generic version.
  • Generic Clarinex
    You can now buy types of Clarinex (desloratadine) in generic form. This eMedTV page gives an overview of the available strengths of the generic products, who makes them, and how they compares to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Claritin Eye
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic Claritin Eye (ketotifen ophthalmic solution) is available in one strength and is made by a number of manufacturers. This resource offers more detailed information on these generic products.
  • Generic Dymista
    This eMedTV Web page explains that azelastine and fluticasone are "generic" names for Dymista (azelastine/fluticasone nasal spray), but they are not generic versions of the drug. This article takes a closer look at when a generic Dymista might be sold.
  • Generic Elestat
    As this eMedTV page explains, Elestat (epinastine ophthalmic solution) is now available in generic form. This Web article takes a closer look at this topic, including information on who makes the generic version of this drug.
  • Generic Flonase
    As this eMedTV page explains, a generic version of Flonase is sold as Fluticasone Propionate nasal spray. This article offers manufacturer information for the generic product and explains whether the generic version is equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic for Claritin
    This eMedTV article tells you what you need to know about the generic versions of Claritin. It explains the difference between generic prescription and non-prescription drugs, and lists the strengths of generic Claritin, as well as some manufacturers.
  • Generic Karbinal ER
    There are currently no generic versions of Karbinal ER (carbinoxamine extended-release oral suspension). This eMedTV segment explains why generic versions of this drug are not available and discusses when a generic might be introduced.
  • Generic Lastacaft
    No generic Lastacaft (alcaftadine) products are currently available. This eMedTV Web selection discusses when a generic product may become available and explains why alcaftadine is the "generic name" of Lastacaft and not a generic version of it.
  • Generic Nasacort AQ
    You can now buy Nasacort AQ (triamcinolone nasal spray) in generic form. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at the generic version of this prescription drug, including details on who manufactures it.
  • Generic Nasalide
    Generic Nasalide products are either called "flunisolide nasal solution" or "flunisolide nasal spray." This eMedTV resource offers more information on generic Nasalide and briefly explains the difference between Nasalide and Nasarel.
  • Generic Nasarel
    Generic Nasarel is sold under the name flunisolide nasal spray. This segment from the eMedTV archives offers more information on generic Nasarel and explains whether it is equivalent to the brand-name version of the allergy medication.
  • Generic Nasonex
    A generic version of Nasonex is currently unavailable for sale in the United States. This portion of the eMedTV library explains that the first patent for Nasonex expires in July 2014, which is the earliest date for a generic version to be introduced.
  • Generic Olopatadine Hydrochloride Ophthalmic Solution
    Olopatadine ophthalmic solution is not available in a generic form. This eMedTV page explains when a generic olopatadine ophthalmic solution may become available and describes the difference between a "generic name" and a "generic version" of a drug.
  • Generic Omnaris
    Omnaris is currently not available in generic form. This page from the eMedTV library discusses the earliest possible date that generic Omnaris could be available and explains what insurance companies may cover until a generic version is available.
  • Generic Optivar
    As this eMedTV page explains, Optivar (azelastine ophthalmic solution) is now available in generic form. This article takes an in-depth look at the generic availability of this product and explains how the generic version compares to brand-name Optivar.
  • Generic Palgic
    Palgic is currently available in both brand-name and generic form. This article found on the eMedTV Web site explains what forms and strengths generic Palgic comes in and offers manufacturer information for the various generic products.
  • Generic Pataday
    There are no generic Pataday products licensed for sale at this time. This eMedTV article explains why drug companies are not allowed to manufacture any generic versions of Pataday and discusses when a generic version may become available.
  • Generic Patanase
    At this time, Patanase (olopatadine nasal spray) is not available in generic form. This article from the eMedTV Web site explains why there are currently no generic Patanase products and explores when a generic version of Patanase may be available.
  • Generic Patanol
    Patanol (olopatadine ophthalmic solution) is not available in generic form. This eMedTV Web resource explains when generic Patanol may become available and discusses the difference between a "generic name" and a "generic version" of a drug.
  • Generic Qnasl
    There is no generic Qnasl (beclomethasone nasal aerosol) available at this time, due to an unexpired patent. This eMedTV segment contains details on when this patent is set to expire and when a generic version of the drug might become available.
  • Generic Rhinocort Aqua
    As soon as the patent for Rhinocort Aqua expires in 2017, generic versions of the drug may be available. This eMedTV article describes generic Rhinocort Aqua in more detail and further explains when it may become available on the market.
  • Generic Singulair
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic Singulair (montelukast) is now available. This Web resource has details on available strengths, manufacturers, and how the generic versions compare to brand-name Singulair.
  • Generic Sudafed
    Many manufacturers have stopped making generic Sudafed (pseudoephedrine). As this eMedTV page explains, this is because all drugs containing pseudoephedrine must be kept behind the pharmacy counter (making it somewhat inconvenient to buy the drug).
  • Generic Veramyst
    A generic version of Veramyst will not be available on the market until August 2021 at the earliest. This page from the eMedTV archives further discusses the availability for generic Veramyst and explains the difference between Flonase and Veramyst.
  • Generic Xyzal
    A patent once prevented any generic Xyzal from being manufactured in the United States. However, as this eMedTV page explains, generic versions of Xyzal are now available. This article takes a closer look at these generic medications.
  • Generic Zaditor
    At this time, generic Zaditor is only available in one strength. As this article from the eMedTV archives explains, the generic version is sold as ketotifen 0.025% and is manufactured by several different drug companies.
  • Generic Zetonna
    This eMedTV resource explains why companies are not allowed to make generic versions of Zetonna. It also discusses when this situation might change and describes the circumstances that may come up to delay generic availability.
  • Generic Zyrtec
    At this time, generic Zyrtec is available as tablets, chewable tablets, and syrup. This page from the eMedTV archives tells you what you need to know about these generic medications, including information on who manufactures them.
  • Generic Zyrtec Eye Drops
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web site, generic versions of Zyrtec Eye Drops (ketotifen ophthalmic solution) are available. This article takes a look at these products, explaining who makes them and listing similar brand-name products.
  • Generic Zyrtec-D
    Generic versions of Zyrtec-D (cetirizine and pseudoephedrine) are now available. This eMedTV article offers an overview of generic Zyrtec-D, including an explanation of how non-prescription generic medications are regulated.
  • Golden Seal
    Goldenseal is a supplement commonly used for treating allergies, infections, and other conditions. This eMedTV segment explains how goldenseal may work and explores the effectiveness of this product. Golden seal is a common misspelling of goldenseal.
  • Golden Seal Side Effects
    Nausea and vomiting are potential side effects of goldenseal. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible goldenseal side effects, including potentially serious problems. Golden seal side effects is a common misspelling of side effects of goldenseal.
  • Goldenseal
    Goldenseal is an herbal supplement used for various conditions, such as allergies or infections. This page on the eMedTV site discusses the supplement's uses in more detail, explores how it works, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Goldenseal and Allergies
    Goldenseal is an herbal supplement claimed to be beneficial for the treatment of allergies. This eMedTV Web page provides more information about allergies and goldenseal, and explores the product's effectiveness for various other uses.
  • Goldenseal and Arthritis
    Goldenseal is a supplement claimed to be beneficial for numerous conditions, such as arthritis. This eMedTV segment contains more information on arthritis and goldenseal, lists other claimed benefits of this supplement, and explores its effectiveness.
  • Goldenseal and Breastfeeding
    In general, goldenseal is not considered to be safe for use while breastfeeding. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at breastfeeding and goldenseal, and further explains why this supplement may not be a good choice for nursing women.
  • Goldenseal and Pregnancy
    Generally, goldenseal is not considered to be safe for use during pregnancy. This page from the eMedTV archives provides more information about pregnancy and goldenseal, and explains what problems may occur if a pregnant woman takes this supplement.
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