Allergies Articles A-Z

Allergy Information - Benadryl Abuse

This page contains links to eMedTV Allergies Articles containing information on subjects from Allergy Information to Benadryl Abuse. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Allergy Information
    Allergies, the immune system's reaction to a normally harmless substance, are fairly common. This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at allergies, with information on the different types and some of the treatment options that are available.
  • Allergy Medicine
    This eMedTV segment outlines the main classes of allergy medicine: antihistamines, decongestants, nasal steroids, and combination drugs. The article also discusses the use of cromolyn sodium (an over-the-counter spray) to relieve allergy symptoms.
  • Allergy Relief
    This section of the eMedTV archives explores various approaches to allergy relief, including medications, allergy shots, and the avoidance of pollen and other allergens. Of these options, only allergy shots offer potential long-term relief.
  • Allergy Research
    Scientists are studying new methods of treating allergic diseases. As this eMedTV article explains, it is hoped that such allergy research will yield a better understanding of the allergic process and lead to the prevention of allergies altogether.
  • Allergy Season
    This video clip discusses allergy season, what it means, and when it occurs.
  • Allergy Shots
    If you are allergic to pollen, pets, or certain other allergens, allergy shots may be an option for you. This eMedTV resource describes the typical schedule for these shots and discusses the benefits and risks of this type of allergy treatment.
  • Allergy Statistics
    This eMedTV article offers several statistics about allergy prevalence and related healthcare costs. For example, up to 16 percent of the U.S. population suffers from hay fever. Understanding the facts about allergies can help promote more research.
  • Allergy Symptoms
    This portion of the eMedTV library describes common allergy symptoms, such as sneezing, itchy and watery eyes, and a runny or stuffy nose. Other signs and symptoms, such as allergic shiners and anaphylactic shock, are also discussed.
  • Allergy Symptoms and What Causes Them
    This video clip looks at allergy symptoms, including hay fever symptoms.
  • Allergy Treatment
    This eMedTV page discusses allergy treatment options, including medications, immunotherapy, and avoiding the substances you are allergic to. While some allergy medicines are available over-the-counter, others require a prescription.
  • Allergys
    Allergies occur when the immune system reacts to a normally harmless substance. This eMedTV article briefly explains the different types of allergies, common treatment options, and possible causes. Allergys is a common misspelling of allergies.
  • Alleriges
    Allergies can be either seasonal or perennial. This page of the eMedTV archives explains the difference between the two, lists possible triggers of allergic reactions, and describes treatment options. Alleriges is a common misspelling of allergies.
  • Alllergies
    Allergies may cause sneezing, coughing, or watery eyes. This eMedTV article lists common allergens, explains how many Americans are affected by them, and describes treatments that are available. Alllergies is a common misspelling of allergies.
  • Alrex
    Alrex is a prescription eye drop approved for treating seasonal eye allergies. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes the effects of this drug, explains how it works, and offers general information on how to use the eye drop.
  • Alrex and Breastfeeding
    The full risks of using Alrex eye drops while breastfeeding are not known at this time. This eMedTV page offers a more in-depth look at breastfeeding and Alrex, and explains whether this medication is likely to reach the bloodstream (and breast milk).
  • Alrex and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is not known if Alrex is safe for use during pregnancy. This section of the eMedTV site contains more information about pregnancy and Alrex, and describes some of the problems that occurred when the drug was given by mouth to animals.
  • Alrex Dosage
    There is only one standard recommended dosage of Alrex, regardless of the severity of your symptoms. As this eMedTV resource explains, it is recommended that adults with seasonal eye allergies apply one drop to each affected eye four times a day.
  • Alrex Drug Interactions
    Significant drug interactions with Alrex are not expected. As this eMedTV article explains, since Alrex is an eye drop and very little of it reaches the bloodstream, it is unlikely to interact with other drugs.
  • Alrex Eye Drops
    Alrex is a prescription medication approved for treating seasonal eye allergies. This page from the eMedTV archives explains how often Alrex eye drops should be used and describes how this medication works to relieve eye allergy symptoms.
  • Alrex Overdose
    It is currently unknown whether it is possible to overdose on Alrex. As this eMedTV article explains, overdose symptoms are more likely if Alrex is taken by mouth rather than used as an eye drop (since very little of it reaches the bloodstream that way).
  • Alrex Side Effects
    Common side effects of Alrex may include eye discharge, itching, and redness. This eMedTV Web page provides a list of other commonly reported side effects and describes potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Alrex Uses
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Alrex is used for the treatment of seasonal eye allergy symptoms. This article discusses the drug's uses in more detail, describes how the medicated eye drop works, and explains whether it should be used in children.
  • Alrex Warnings and Precautions
    If you have glaucoma, let your doctor know before using Alrex. This eMedTV segment further explains what you should discuss with your doctor before trying Alrex. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this eye drop are also listed here.
  • Alvert
    Alavert, an antihistamine medication, is approved to treat allergy symptoms. This article on the eMedTV site further discusses this drug, including information on what to tell your doctor before using it. Alvert is a common misspelling of Alavert.
  • Astalin
    Astelin is a nasal spray that is prescribed to treat seasonal nasal allergies and non-allergic rhinitis. This eMedTV page explains how the medication works and offers a link to more detailed information. Astalin is a common misspelling of Astelin.
  • Astelin
    Astelin is a prescription drug that is licensed to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis and vasomotor rhinitis. This eMedTV segment offers dosing information for the drug, explains how it works, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Astelin 137 mcg Nasal Spray
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor may prescribe Astelin 137 mcg nasal spray to treat nasal symptoms due to seasonal allergies or other causes. This page further discusses dosing guidelines for adults and children, including tips on using this spray.
  • Astelin and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether Astelin and breastfeeding is a safe combination. As this eMedTV page explains, it is not clear whether Astelin passes through breast milk. This article also discusses the possible risks of using the drug while breastfeeding.
  • Astelin and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe for pregnant women to use Astelin. As this article on the eMedTV Web site explains, animal studies on Astelin and pregnancy show that the drug can increase the risk of birth defects, low fetal weight, and miscarriages.
  • Astelin and Weight Gain
    Weight gain is a potential side effect of Astelin. This page on the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Astelin and weight gain, including an explanation of how common the side effect is and suggestions on what to do if weight gain does occur.
  • Astelin Dosage
    The recommended Astelin dosage for treating vasomotor rhinitis is two sprays in each nostril twice daily. This eMedTV Web page offers tips for using the nasal spray and also includes Astelin dosing guidelines for the treatment of nasal allergies.
  • Astelin Drug Interactions
    If barbiturates, narcotics, or cimetidine are taken together with Astelin, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV resource lists other medicines that should not be taken with Astelin and describes the potential effects of these drug interactions.
  • Astelin for Allergies
    This eMedTV page explains that when using Astelin for allergies, the medication can help relieve symptoms such as sneezing, a runny or stuffy nose, and nasal itching. This article also covers how Astelin works and general dosing guidelines.
  • Astelin Nasal Spray
    As a prescription nasal spray, Astelin is used to treat sneezing, runny nose, and nasal itching. This eMedTV segment offers more detail on Astelin nasal spray, including information on its uses, potential side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Astelin Nasl
    Astelin is a medicine prescribed to treat nasal symptoms due to seasonal allergies or other irritants. This eMedTV page further discusses Astelin, including possible side effects and dosing tips. Nasl is the abbreviation of nasal.
  • Astelin Nose Spray
    Astelin is a prescription nose spray used to treat sneezing, a runny nose, and nasal itching. This eMedTV segment offers more detail on Astelin nasal spray, including information on its uses, potential side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Astelin Overdose
    Taking an entire bottle of Astelin all at once is unlikely to cause serious problems in adults. This eMedTV segment explores in detail the possible effects of an Astelin overdose and also describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Astelin Side Effects
    Common side effects of Astelin may include bitter taste, sore throat, and drowsiness. This eMedTV resource contains a list of other common side effects, as well as potentially serious side effects that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Astelin Uses
    Astelin is used for treating seasonal nasal allergy symptoms and vasomotor rhinitis. This segment of the eMedTV library offers more information on specific Astelin uses, explains how the drug works, and lists possible off-label uses for the medicine.
  • Astelin Warnings and Precautions
    You should not use Astelin if you are allergic to any components of the medication. This page on the eMedTV Web site includes a list of other Astelin warnings and precautions, and describes possible side effects to look out for during treatment.
  • Astepro
    Astepro is a prescription nasal spray approved for treating nasal allergy symptoms. This eMedTV Web page explains how Astepro works and offers a more in-depth look at the drug's benefits, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Astepro and Breastfeeding
    At this time, it is not known whether it is safe for breastfeeding women to use Astepro. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at breastfeeding and Astepro, and describes potential side effects you should look for in your nursing child.
  • Astepro and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Astepro during pregnancy are currently unknown. This eMedTV Web article provides more information about this drug and pregnancy, and explains what problems occurred when the medication was given to animals in clinical studies.
  • Astepro Dosage
    The standard recommended Astepro dosage is one or two sprays in each nostril per day. This page from the eMedTV Web site contains more dosing information, including detailed instructions on how to use the nasal spray.
  • Astepro Drug Interactions
    Cimetidine and medicines that cause drowsiness may interact with Astepro. These drug interactions, as this eMedTV segment explains, could increase your risk of developing side effects or decrease your mental alertness.
  • Astepro Medication Information
    Are you looking for information on the medication Astepro? This selection from the eMedTV library presents a brief overview of this product, including when and how to apply it and important information to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Astepro Overdose
    It is not known exactly what to expect from an overdose of Astepro. This part of the eMedTV library explores the potential effects of an overdose with this medication and explains what treatment options are available if you take too much of this drug.
  • Astepro Side Effects
    Common side effects of Astepro may include fatigue, drowsiness, and nosebleeds. This eMedTV page lists other possible side effects (including those seen in postmarketing experience) and explains which problems may require medical attention.
  • Astepro Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Astepro is used for the treatment of nasal allergy symptoms, such as runny or stuffy nose. This article looks at how the medication works, lists possible off-label uses, and discusses the drug's use in children.
  • Astepro Warnings and Precautions
    Talk to your doctor before using Astepro if you are pregnant. This eMedTV article lists other conditions you should tell your doctor about before starting Astepro. Precautions and warnings on side effects are also listed on this page.
  • Astilin
    Astelin is a prescription medicine used for treating seasonal nasal allergies and non-allergic rhinitis. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at this drug, including its uses, dosing, and effects. Astilin is a common misspelling of Astelin.
  • Astipro
    Astepro is a nasal spray that is available by prescription to treat seasonal nasal allergy symptoms. This eMedTV Web page explains how the medication works and describes its effects. Astipro is a common misspelling of Astepro.
  • Banadryl
    The antihistamine drug Benadryl is approved to treat allergies, insomnia, and many other conditions. This eMedTV resource lists other approved Benadryl uses and describes how the medication works. Banadryl is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Beclometasone
    Beclomethasone is a drug used for reducing inflammation caused by allergies and other conditions. This eMedTV page describes beclomethasone in more detail and covers specific uses of the drug. Beclometasone is a common misspelling of beclomethasone.
  • Beclomethasone
    Beclomethasone is a medicine that is used for reducing inflammation in people with asthma or allergies. This eMedTV page further describes the nasal spray and inhaler versions of this drug, including information on dosing and possible side effects.
  • Beconase
    Beconase is a nasal spray that is used for treating allergic and non-allergic rhinitis. This eMedTV resource further explains what the drug is used for, describes how it works, and offers information on when and how to use the nasal spray.
  • Beconase and Breastfeeding
    Currently, it is not known if Beconase passes through breast milk. This eMedTV Web page provides a more in-depth look at Beconase and breastfeeding, including information on why the drug is not likely to pass through breast milk in high amounts.
  • Beconase and Pregnancy
    Beconase could cause problems during pregnancy. This portion of the eMedTV Web site offers more detailed information about Beconase and pregnancy, and describes the complications that occurred when the drug was given to pregnant mice and rabbits.
  • Beconase AQ Nasal Spray
    As this eMedTV resource explains, the nasal spray Beconase AQ is often quite effective in relieving conditions that cause sneezing, itching, and irritation in the nose. This segment addresses the uses for this drug, side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Beconase Dosage
    For children ages 6 to 11, the recommended Beconase dosage is one spray in each nostril twice daily. This eMedTV resource also contains Beconase dosing guidelines for adults and children over the age of 12, as well as tips for using the nasal spray.
  • Beconase Drug Interactions
    There are currently no known Beconase drug interactions. As this section of the eMedTV Web site explains, however, it is possible that there are drugs that may interact with Beconase that are not known at this time.
  • Beconase Overdose
    A Beconase overdose is not likely to cause any problems. This page on the eMedTV Web site further explains what to expect from an overdose of the drug and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Beconase Side Affects
    Common Beconase side effects may include nose or throat irritation, lightheadedness, and nausea. This eMedTV page also lists serious side effects that require medical attention. Beconase side affects is a common misspelling of Beconase side effects.
  • Beconase Side Effects
    Common side effects of Beconase include nausea, runny nose, and watery eyes. Besides common side effects, this eMedTV page also lists potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention (such as frequent infections or nosebleeds).
  • Beconase Uses
    Beconase is used for treating nasal allergies and non-allergic nasal symptoms. This article from the eMedTV archives discusses other Beconase uses, explains how the medication works, and lists possible off-label uses for the prescription nasal spray.
  • Beconase Warnings and Precautions
    Beconase is a steroid that may suppress the immune system. This eMedTV page offers a list of important Beconase warnings and precautions to be aware of before starting treatment, including the possible side effects or complications that may occur.
  • Benadrel
    Benadryl, an antihistamine medication, is approved to treat allergy symptoms. This article on the eMedTV site covers other Benadryl uses and lists some of the potential side effects of this medicine. Benadrel is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benadril
    Benadryl is a type of antihistamine used for treating allergies and other conditions. This page from the eMedTV library discusses Benadryl uses in more detail and explains how the medication works. Benadril is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benadrly Overdose
    Symptoms of a Benadryl overdose may include fever, nausea, and dilated pupils. This eMedTV segment covers other possible overdose symptoms, including potentially life-threatening effects. Benadrly overdose is a common misspelling of Benadryl overdose.
  • Benadryal
    Benadryl is an antihistamine product commonly used as an allergy treatment and sleep aid. This eMedTV article describes the various forms that Benadryl comes in and offers general warnings for the drug. Benadryal is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benadryl
    Benadryl is an antihistamine medication approved for many uses, including treating allergy symptoms. This eMedTV segment discusses the drug's uses in more detail, explains how it works, and explains what forms and strengths this product comes in.
  • Benadryl 25 mg
    There are many forms of Benadryl available. As this eMedTV page explains, Benadryl 25 mg products come in the form of capsules, tablets, Liqui-Gels, and dissolvable strips. Some products are available over the counter but others are prescription-only.
  • Benadryl 50 mg
    At this time, Benadryl 50 mg is the highest strength available for this medication. This segment from the eMedTV library lists some of the other forms and strengths available for Benadryl, including prescription and non-prescription products.
  • Benadryl Abuse
    There are many reasons why people abuse Benadryl. As this eMedTV page explains, for example, some people use the drug to cause sedation in others. This article takes a closer look at abusing this medication.
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