Allergies Articles A-Z

Benadryl Addiction - Clarinex and Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Allergies Articles containing information on subjects from Benadryl Addiction to Clarinex and Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Benadryl Addiction
    Benadryl is not usually addicting, but people taking it regularly can become tolerant to the drug's effects. This eMedTV article further discusses the possibility of addiction to Benadryl and explores the potential dangers of Benadryl abuse.
  • Benadryl Allergy Medication
    Benadryl is an antihistamine product commonly used for the treatment of allergy symptoms. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes how Benadryl allergy medication works and explains what side effects may occur with this product.
  • Benadryl and Breastfeeding
    Benadryl is known to pass through breast milk. As this page from eMedTV Web site explains, while some sources state that breastfeeding and Benadryl are compatible, the manufacturer of the drug warns against using this drug while breastfeeding.
  • Benadryl and Lactation
    At this time, it is not known whether it is safe for breastfeeding women to take Benadryl. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Benadryl and lactation, and explains what problems may occur if this drug is used while breastfeeding.
  • Benadryl and Pregnancy
    The full risks of having a pregnant woman take Benadryl are not known at this time. As this eMedTV Web page explains, based on animal studies on pregnancy and Benadryl, the antihistamine medication does not appear to present a risk to the fetus.
  • Benadryl as a Sleep Aid
    Benadryl is an antihistamine medication used for a variety of purposes. As this eMedTV article explains, many people use Benadryl as a sleep aid. Like many antihistamines, Benadryl also works as a sedative, making it effective for insomnia treatment.
  • Benadryl Capsules
    There are two types of Benadryl capsules; one is available over the counter and one is prescription-only. This eMedTV resource describes the other different forms and strengths that this medication comes in.
  • Benadryl Complications
    As this eMedTV article explains, people over 60 should consult their doctors before using Benadryl. Complications can occur because elderly people are more susceptible to the drug's side effects, and Benadryl can worsen many conditions of the elderly.
  • Benadryl Cream
    Benadryl is an antihistamine drug that comes in various forms and strengths. This page on the eMedTV Web site describes the different forms of Benadryl cream and explains what other topical Benadryl products are currently available.
  • Benadryl Dosage
    For the oral form of Benadryl, dosage recommendations range from 25 to 50 mg every four to six hours. This eMedTV Web page also includes dosing information for topical Benadryl, and discusses dosing in children.
  • Benadryl Drug Interactions
    Alcohol, MAOIs, and anticholinergic drugs may interact with Benadryl. As this eMedTV article explains, these interactions could increase your risk for developing side effects (such as drowsiness, dry mouth, constipation, and difficulty passing urine).
  • Benadryl for Allergies
    Although most people use Benadryl for allergies, there are many other approved uses for this drug. This eMedTV article explains how Benadryl works for allergy treatment and describes the specific effects of this antihistamine medication.
  • Benadryl for Infants
    As this selection from the eMedTV archives explains, children as young as two years old can use topical forms of Benadryl. For infants who are born premature (and newborns), this medication is not recommended at all.
  • Benadryl for Insomnia
    Benadryl is an antihistamine medication approved for the treatment of allergy symptoms. As this eMedTV resource explains, many people also use Benadryl for insomnia (prescription products and non-prescription diphenhydramine products only).
  • Benadryl for Sleep
    Many people use Benadryl for sleep, although the drug is most commonly used for treating allergies. This eMedTV Web page explains how an antihistamine such as Benadryl can work as a sedative to help people with insomnia fall asleep.
  • Benadryl in Children
    The use of Benadryl in children has been adequately studied, so the drug is approved for use in children. As this eMedTV page explains, oral Benadryl can be used in children six and older, and topical products can be used in children as young as two.
  • Benadryl in the Elderly
    There are certain warnings to be aware of concerning the safety of Benadryl in the elderly. As this eMedTV page explains, people over age 60 must use caution while taking Benadryl because they may be more susceptible to the side effects of the drug.
  • Benadryl Ingredients
    Benadryl contains one active ingredient, plus several different inactive ingredients. This eMedTV page lists various ingredients in Benadryl, including the active ingredient, inactive ingredients, and ingredients used in generic versions of the drug.
  • Benadryl Medication Information
    Benadryl is an antihistamine used for treating allergies, insomnia, and various other conditions. This eMedTV article provides more Benadryl medication information, including general warnings for this drug and a list of potential side effects.
  • Benadryl Oral
    Benadryl is an antihistamine often used for treating allergies. As this eMedTV page explains, there are many forms of Benadryl (oral, topical, and injectable forms); some are available by prescription only, while others can be found over the counter.
  • Benadryl Overdose
    If you take too much Benadryl, you may experience symptoms like fever, flushing, or dry mouth. This eMedTV resource lists other symptoms that may occur with an overdose of Benadryl and explains what treatment options are available for the overdose.
  • Benadryl Risks
    Benadryl can cause breathing problems in people with asthma or COPD. This part of the eMedTV Web site discusses other Benadryl risks, including other complications that may occur with this drug and potential side effects of the medication.
  • Benadryl Side Effects
    Common side effects of Benadryl may include dizziness, indigestion, and coordination problems. This eMedTV resource explains what other side effects may occur with Benadryl products, including potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Benadryl Types
    There are many different types of Benadryl, including over-the-counter and prescription-only products. This eMedTV resource lists some of the various types, including adult products, children's products, and products for the skin.
  • Benadryl Uses
    Approved Benadryl uses include the treatment of allergy symptoms, insomnia, and motion sickness. This eMedTV article lists other approved uses for both prescription and non-prescription Benadryl and also discusses possible off-label uses for the drug.
  • Benadryl Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article contains some general warnings and precautions with Benadryl that you should be aware of before using the antihistamine, including a list of potential side effects of the drug and information on who should not use this product.
  • Benadryle
    Benadryl is an antihistamine product commonly used to relieve or prevent allergy symptoms. This eMedTV article covers other approved Benadryl uses and lists potential side effects of this medication. Benadryle is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benadryll Overdose
    A Benadryl overdose may cause nausea, agitation, and flushing. This eMedTV segment lists other potential overdose symptoms and explains what treatment options are available. Benadryll overdose is a common misspelling of Benadryl overdose.
  • Benedril
    Benadryl is an antihistamine product used to treat allergies, insomnia, and other conditions. This eMedTV page discusses Benadryl uses in more detail and describes the various forms that this drug comes in. Benedril is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benedrill
    Benadryl is commonly used as a sleep aid and treatment for allergy symptoms. This eMedTV Web page explores the other benefits of Benadryl and describes the various forms that this drug comes in. Benedrill is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benedryl
    There are numerous Benadryl products available, all approved for different uses. This eMedTV Web page explores some of the approved Benadryl uses and explains what side effects may occur with this drug. Benedryl is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benedryl Dosage
    The recommended Benadryl dosage for treating allergies is 25 to 50 mg every four to six hours. This page on the eMedTV Web site also offers Benadryl dosing recommendations for children. Benedryl dosage is a common misspelling of Benadryl dosage.
  • Benedryl Overdose
    As with any drug, it is possible to overdose on Benadryl. Overdose effects, as this eMedTV Web page explains, may include rapid breathing, hallucinations, and a rapid heart rate. Benedryl overdose is a common misspelling of Benadryl overdose.
  • Benedryl Side Effects
    Potential Benadryl side effects include drowsiness, chills, and coordination problems. This eMedTV segment also explains which side effects of Benadryl require medical attention. Benedryl side effects is a common misspelling of Benadryl side effects.
  • Benedryll
    Many people take Benadryl to relieve allergy symptoms or to help them sleep. This eMedTV resource further explores the benefits of Benadryl and explains how the drug works for treating various conditions. Benedryll is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benefits of Quercetin
    Quercetin is claimed to be beneficial for treating high cholesterol, diabetes, and various other conditions. This eMedTV resource lists other possible quercetin benefits and explores how the dietary supplement may work for these conditions.
  • Benidril
    Benadryl is a popular allergy medicine that is also often used as a sleep aid. This eMedTV Web page outlines the benefits of Benadryl and explains what side effects may occur with this antihistamine drug. Benidril is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benidrill
    The antihistamine Benadryl is used for treating allergies, insomnia, and numerous other conditions. This eMedTV segment explains how Benadryl works and describes the various forms that this drug comes in. Benidrill is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benidryl
    Benadryl is an antihistamine commonly used as a sleep aid and for treating allergy symptoms. This eMedTV page further explains what Benadryl is used for and describes the various forms of this drug. Benidryl is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benydril
    Benadryl is an antihistamine drug available both over the counter and by prescription. This eMedTV page explains what Benadryl is used for and offers general warnings and precautions for this product. Benydril is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Benydryl
    Benadryl is an antihistamine medication available by prescription and over the counter. This eMedTV page explores what Benadryl is used for and explains what you should be aware of before using this drug. Benydryl is a common misspelling of Benadryl.
  • Bepreve
    Bepreve is commonly prescribed to help relieve itching of the eyes caused by allergies. This page of the eMedTV Web site provides a detailed overview of this drug, with information on when and how to take it, side effects to watch for, and more.
  • Bepreve and Breastfeeding
    While the manufacturer recommends that women who are breastfeeding avoid Bepreve, this eMedTV resource explains that the drug is not likely to cause problems since very little of it actually reaches the bloodstream and from there, breast milk.
  • Bepreve and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains that in animal studies on pregnancy and Bepreve (bepotastine besilate), the drug increased the risk of stillbirth. However, these studies used extremely high doses, so it is unlikely that the drug will cause problems in humans.
  • Bepreve Dosage
    The standard dose of Bepreve is one drop in each affected eye, twice a day. As this eMedTV Web page explains, both children and adults take the same dosage. In addition, it is important to keep the dropper from touching anything to prevent contamination.
  • Bepreve Drug Interactions
    People generally do not need to worry about drug interactions with Bepreve. As this eMedTV resource explains, because the medicine is an eye drop, very little of it enters the bloodstream. However, you should still tell your doctor you are taking it.
  • Bepreve Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web presentation discusses the drug Bepreve. Information includes its uses, dosing, side effects, warnings, and possible drug interactions.
  • Bepreve Overdose
    Healthcare providers do not know currently what to expect when a person takes too much Bepreve. This eMedTV selection explains that overdose symptoms will likely vary from person to person, based on certain factors, such as how the drug was taken.
  • Bepreve Side Effects
    An unpleasant taste in the mouth is the most common side effect seen with Bepreve. This page of the eMedTV library describes other common reactions to the drug and discusses potentially serious problems that require prompt medical attention.
  • Bepreve Uses
    Children as young as two years old can use Bepreve to relieve eye symptoms associated with allergies. This eMedTV resource describes how this drug works, discusses off-label uses, and provides assurance that it can be used safely on a long-term basis.
  • Bepreve Warnings and Precautions
    Bepreve is approved for use as an eye drop only; it should not be taken by mouth. This eMedTV page provides additional Bepreve warnings and precautions you need to know to ensure a safe treatment process, including who should avoid the drug.
  • Can You Still Buy the Original Actifed?
    Brand-name original Actifed is no longer sold in the United States. This eMedTV Web resource further addresses the question, "Can you still buy original Actifed?" This page also explains that generic versions of original Actifed are still available.
  • Can You Take Sudafed While Pregnant?
    Many women wonder, "Can I take Sudafed while pregnant?" As this eMedTV resource explains, the full risks are not known at this time. Early studies show that taking it in early pregnancy can increase the risk of certain problems.
  • Chromelin
    Your healthcare provider may recommend cromolyn if you have allergies or asthma. This eMedTV article discusses the prescription drug and how it works. A link to more information is also provided. Chromelin is a common misspelling of cromolyn.
  • Cigarette Smoke Allergy
    Cigarette smoke allergy is caused by the numerous toxic chemicals and irritants found in cigarette smoke. This eMedTV article discusses cigarette smoke allergy in detail and links to other information on allergies.
  • Cingulaar
    Singulair is often prescribed to treat nasal allergy symptoms and asthma. This eMedTV article discusses Singulair use in children, describes the drug in detail, and lists side effects that may occur. Cingulaar is a common misspelling of Singulair.
  • Cingulair Asthma
    Singulair is a prescription drug approved for treating asthma and nasal allergy symptoms. This eMedTV segment explains how Singulair works and offers a link to more detailed information. Cingulair asthma is a common misspelling of Singulair.
  • Cinguliar
    Singulair is a prescription medication licensed for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. This eMedTV page describes Singulair in more detail and explains how it works for allergies or asthma. Cinguliar is a common misspelling of Singulair.
  • Claratin
    Claritin is a non-prescription drug used to provide relief from most allergy symptoms. This page from the eMedTV archives offers a brief overview of the drug and includes a link to more information. Claratin is a common misspelling of Claritin.
  • Claratin Side Effects
    Common Claritin side effects reported in adults include headache, fatigue, and drowsiness. This page on the eMedTV site also lists common side effects seen in children. Claratin side effects is a common misspelling of Claritin side effects.
  • Claratin-D
    Claritin-D is a non-prescription drug used to treat allergies and nasal congestion due to the common cold. This eMedTV segment further discusses Claritin-D uses and lists side effects that may occur. Claratin d is a common misspelling of Claritin-D.
  • Claraton
    Claritin, which is now available without a prescription, can provide relief from common allergy symptoms. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works, lists side effects, and links to more information. Claraton is a common misspelling of Claritin.
  • Claredon
    Claritin is a medication approved for the treatment of allergy symptoms and itching due to hives. This eMedTV Web page further explores these Claritin uses and describes the effects of the medicine. Claredon is a common misspelling of Claritin.
  • Clarenex
    Clarinex is an antihistamine used for treating chronic hives or itching and seasonal and indoor allergies. This eMedTV page covers Clarinex uses in more detail and links to more in-depth information. Clarenex is a common misspelling of Clarinex.
  • Claretin
    Claritin is an over-the-counter medicine often used for relieving allergy symptoms. This eMedTV resource covers other Claritin uses, explains how the drug works, and lists side effects that may occur. Claretin is a common misspelling of Claritin.
  • Clareton
    Claritin is a non-prescription antihistamine commonly used for allergy relief. This eMedTV Web page explains what else Claritin is used for, describes its effects, and lists side effects that may occur. Clareton is a common misspelling of Claritin.
  • Clariden
    Claritin is a nonprescription antihistamine used for treating allergy symptoms and itching due to hives. This eMedTV article explores the effects of Claritin and lists potential side effects of the drug. Clariden is a common misspelling of Claritin.
  • Claridon
    People with allergies or hives may try a nonprescription drug called Claritin to help relieve symptoms. This eMedTV page offers information on what you should be aware of before using this medication. Claridon is a common misspelling of Claritin.
  • Clarinex
    The prescription medication Clarinex treats allergy symptoms, as well as chronic hives and itching. This eMedTV Web page discusses how the drug works and medical conditions to discuss with your doctor before taking it, such as liver disease.
  • Clarinex 2.5 mg
    As this eMedTV page explains, Clarinex 2.5 mg once daily is the recommended starting Clarinex dosage for treating allergies and hives in children age 6 to 11 years old. This page also covers Clarinex dosing for adults, as well as tips on taking this drug.
  • Clarinex 5 mg
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Clarinex 5 mg once daily is the recommended starting dose for adults and children age 12 and older. This article also describes factors that may affect your dosage, such as age and other drugs you are taking.
  • Clarinex Allergies Medication
    As an antihistamine medication, Clarinex can treat allergies and hives. This eMedTV page further discusses using this drug for allergies and hives, including information on how the drug works, potential side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Clarinex Allergy Medicine
    People with allergies may benefit from the prescription drug Clarinex. This portion of the eMedTV Web site briefly describes this allergy medicine, with details on the specific symptoms Clarinex can treat and what types of side effects are possible.
  • Clarinex and Dry Mouth
    If you take Clarinex and dry mouth is a problem, you can combat it with simple remedies. This eMedTV page explains how you can relieve dry mouth by sipping water and sugarless drinks; sucking on candy; and avoiding tobacco, alcohol, and salty foods.
  • Clarinex and Insomnia
    Less than 1 percent of people who take Clarinex have insomnia. As this eMedTV page explains, it is impossible to tell whether Clarinex and insomnia are linked or if other factors are to blame. This article also gives tips on how to beat insomnia.
  • Clarinex and Pregnancy
    In discussing Clarinex and pregnancy, this eMedTV page explains how the drug's status as a Category C medicine means that it could potentially harm a fetus. A pregnant woman may take the drug if the benefits outweigh the possible risk.
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